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written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
civil rights to the forefront of that year's presidential campaign. a gunman would assassinate reverent king then two months later, robert f. kennedy was shot and killed on the night he won the california primary. george watson brought us this report back in 1988. 20 years after the king assassination. >> like anybody i would like to live a long life, longevity has its place. but i'm not concerned about that now. i just want to do god's will. and he's allowed me to go up to the mountain, and i've looked over and i've seen the promise land. i mean i'll get there with you. but i want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the promise land. >> reporter: the preacher became the prophet. while standing in tennessee, martin luther king's words rang horribly true. a single gunshot would kill the leader. the shot came from over there. fired from a tiny room it tore into the body of the entire country. rioting broke out. blacks bellowed out theirager in a fire storm of anger and frustration. all this triggered by the murder of a man who preached that freedom would come through nonv
news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
on the civil rights agenda with access to the white house and for congress, all of that was contingent not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: he was very upset on the stands he took because he felt weak handled civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me as i am up for the reelection you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: now will understand what courage it took to take the stand she did, and i understand more about why she hesitated coretta didn't hesitate. she was involved in the entire war movement but she wasn't a public figure so she could send her to a centrally speak for him. >> host: and again history proves dr. king right. >> guest: this is one of the ways in which i think that he is a visionary. i think that he understood the connection between the anticolonial movements that were going on around the world, and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing that we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anticolonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the a
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these are things that king gave his life for in the end. why is there so little traction on this issue? >> i think that the civil rights reforms were actually the easier part of his dream. it did not cost anything. there was no appropriation associated with the passage of the civil rights act of 1964 or the voting rights act of 1965. there was not a major investment required. to deal with the issue of poverty, you have to be thinking about a major investment in our declining public education system. you have to be thinking about the h
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
kron 4 news. today, americans across the bay and the nation honoring civil rights leader, dr. martin luther king junior. he played a significant role in advancing african - american and human rights through non-violence and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his assasination in 1968. here in the bay area -- thousands of people gathered at the yerba buena gardens in san francisco for the annual m-l-k -day- celbration. here are some of the sights and sounds from the holiday event. this was the scene at diridon station early this morning in san jose. hundreds of people honoring dr. king -- by boarding the freedom train. an annual tradition. the dr. martin luther king jr association. charters and pays for the trains. they have been doing so for the past 30 years. actually, two trains were needed to accommodate this year's crowds. many people hearr mission on this day. is to keep dr king's dream alive. hundreds more freedom riders climbed aboard in palo alto for the trip to san francisco. where they were to join the march and rally in honor of the late civil rights leader. and d
of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him mention stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. it's an iconic speech. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the equality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come into the fold. here the president of the united states
did lose. but for king he interested everything he accomplished with civil-rights was the white house and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go in
honoring civil rights leader, drf. martin luther king junior. he played a significant role in advancing african - american and human rights through non- violence and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his assasination in 1968. for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual freedom train for >> reporter: long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday tribute to the late civil rights leader. hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going history lesson. >> we listened to his speech. it was pretty amazing and i feel very inspired. >> i do not know about anybody else but i think it was great. >> reporter: the freedom train picked up momentum and more passengers in palo alto as it rolled on north tow
the alabama civil civil rights march. >> this is for all americans. to get out and enjoy this day and to celebrate and remember the struggles that we all have been through. [ singing ] >> reporter: hundreds of people join said them for a mile and a half march to the gardens. >> celebrating dr. king and celebrating community. that is important. >> reporter: more than a thousand people attended prayer services services and presentations on the life of dr. king. she knew and marched with dr. king. >> very, very nice. he was a wonderful person. wonderful person. non-violent. turning of the cheek. >> reporter: she was one of many african americans turned away that voting both. joining a dangerous protest march. she marched with dr. king on the civil rights march. >> very, very scary and a memorable experience that just doesn't go away. >> reporter: many people said a lot changed but more needs to change. reporting live in san francisco, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 49er head coach jim harbaugh had a lot to say today, we will let you hear what he is not looking forward to when he
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bible, had those of us in lead civil rights organizations, their labor organizations. they're on the platform. not in a guest seat somewhere else, right there only the platform. and martin luther king's son. i mean, i think that he was saying america has changed. and we've got to deal with the change and let's start celebrating the change. >> so, i think he did two things. one, i would agree with you. he said that america is -- has achieved a certain kind of difference that it is different now. but he didn't say i changed it, right? it's that line. s, seneca falls, it is him naming each of the turning point watershed moments in american history in terms of how that change begins to occur. but then he does the thing, of course, that king did in the "i have a dream" speech. he goes all the way back to the initial social contract. he goes back to the nirinitial declaration of independence. he says that the basis of this is in the election, in his right to claim the victory as a ro greszive president. but the real basis for this go
. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere
conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of pr
that brought them closer to the action than ever. >>> honoring the civil rights leader by hopping on a train, more on that, where that train is going and how you can ride. [ telephone rings ] good evening this is flo. [laughs] yes, i'm that flo. aren't you sweet! licensed phone-ups available 24/7. call 1-800-progressive. >>> good morning, b.a.r.t. is back on time. it was a quick turn around. we could gotten word that may they be experiencing major b.a.r.t. delays. they were dealing with a slight computer problems problem. we just -- problem. they were able to resolve the computer problems quickly. they are on a saturday schedule. it is the martin luther king holiday and a lot of mass transiting including muni, golden gate ferries and ac transit on the east bay, on a typical saturday or sunday schedule. we're still watching this traffic alert. one lane is still blocked northbound 880 approaching washington street. we are really not seeing much of a delay. it's because there's just not as much traffic on the roads. a lot of schools are out. no post
are honoring the civil rights leader played a significant role in advancing american rights, human rights for nonviolence in civil disobedience. until his assassination in 1968. thousands of people, the tributes started with a train ride. this was the annual fee o freedom train. he played a significant roleamerican rights through non-violence, and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual 'freedom train.' >> long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going >> we listened to his speech of viagra tree might think it is pretty amazing. it is history. >> i do not know about everyone else but i did not realize ther
like yeager for being passionate because guns are the civil rights victims of our time. it's no coincidence that most of them are black. [ laughter ] and that i get nasty looks when i sit down with one at a lunch counter. [ laughter ] and i'm not the only one who thinks so. standing with me is larry ward founder of the first-ever gun appreciation day, which happens to be this saturday, the same weekend as martin luther king day. and that's no coincidence. >> i believe that gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think martin luther king would agree with me if he were alive today. >> stephen: yes, dr. king would be pro-gun just as surely as jesus would be pro-nail. [ laughter ] because like mr. ward, dr. king understood that the root of all oppression is lack of firepower. [ laughter ] >> if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. [ laughter ] >> stephen: yes! if only america's founders had turned to the people they owned and chained in
? >> a heart as big as the world. >> john bellcastor was barack obama's law partner doing civil rights work in chicago from 1993 to 2003. >> in our law firm he never raised his voice. the no drama obama you hear about today was that way back in 1993. >> and dotting the crowd the young celebrities drawn to obama. katie berry and john mayer and jeffrey wright who spoke of the hope of the day. >> it's about the hope of the country and the example we set to the world in terms of free and working democracy. and it's about partnership and it's about what you know, the common ground between all of us as americans. and so, you know, if this doesn't illustrate that then we have a lot of hard work to do. >> and the musical artists mostly represented the young 21st century artists like kelly clarkson. ♪ >> and an obama favorite and friend, beyonce. ♪ for the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming >> we the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal. it is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
to a second term on a holiday celebrating one of its foremost civil rights leaders. >> while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing. >> reporter: it was as much an inauguration as a cross cultural celebration. a place where a puerto rican woman raised in a housing project swears in a catholic environment from scranton, pennsylvania, where a gay cuban immigrant reads his home about a rising sun shining equally on all of us. >> my face, your face. millions of faces in morning's mirrors. >> president obama tied it all together in his speech, linking his vision to the evolving history of civil rights in the u.s. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forbearers to seneca falls and selma and stonewall. just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsong, who left footprints along this great mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. >> reporter: he swore on the bibles of abraham lincoln and dr. martin luther king jr., connecticuting
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
. >> it is a way to educate the young about the past civil rights strag rights -- struggles. and elissa harrington is there with more about how they can learn to ride the ride. >> reporter: this freedom train is to honor the birthday of martin luther king and leaves the station at 9:30. this is the 27th year that the mlk association of santa clara valley has organized this ride from san jose to san francisco. it commemorates his march from selma alabama to the dap toll of montgomery in 1965 and covers 54 miles. this is the longest running freedom train in the united states and the rides were brought about my king's wife. the freedom train today has four stops. again, it will leave san jose at 9:30 and will stop three times along the peninsula in sunnyvale, palo alto and san mateo. round trip tickets are $10 you are advised to come early because lines can get long. live in san jose, elissa harrington. cbs 5. >>> a march and parade will proceed from the caltrains depot. that will be followed by an interface commemoration ceremony. and also in san fran
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
very much. >> now bernice king the daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king jr. and coretta scott king discusses the recently published biography of her mother. desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king. she talked with booktv at bookexpo america publishing's annual trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice king who is edith scott dagley? >> guest: at edith scott bickley -- coretta scott king was the wife of martin luther king jr. -- cohost land your mother. >> guest: yes my mother so she was my aunt. she and my mother grew up in alabama together and she later became a drama professor. in fact she founded the drama department at the state university. she was a very lively woman and unfortunately passed last year in june. after completing this book. >> this book is desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt eva scott dagley? when did she write this book lacks. >> guest: well it was a journey that began with my mother's requested 1966 to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threaten
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)

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